The Army’s aerostat sensor suite built by Raytheon [RTN] has demonstrated an ability to take out a cruise missile through sea-based defenses in a joint test recently with the Navy, the company said Friday.

The Joint Land Attack Cruise Missile Defense Elevated Netted Sensor System, or JLENS, which is based on a tethered aerostat, successfully fed tracking data through the Navy’s Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC) sensors network and Aegis Weapon System to guide a Standard Missile 6 into a successful strike of a target drone, the company said.

The test took place at White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, Raytheon said. Raytheon also builds CEC and the SM-6, while Lockheed Martin [LMT] produces Aegis.

"JLENS has demonstrated its ability to integrate with other components of naval integrated fire control-counter air, significantly expanding the force’s cruise missile defense umbrella," Dean Barten, the Army’s JLENS product manager, said in a Raytheon press release. "Commanders can detect threats shortly after they are launched with JLENS’ 360-degree, long-range surveillance capability, while the JLENS integrated fire-control radar enables commanders to more effectively employ weapons like the Standard Missile 6."

JLENS consists of two aerostats, one that houses the tracking radar and another the 360-degree surveillance radar. Only the tracking radar aerostat was used in the test with the Navy, a company spokesman said.

JLENS is also designed to act against low-flying manned and unmanned aircraft, and moving surface vehicles such as boats, SCUD launchers, automobiles, trucks and tanks, Raytheon said.

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